Jun 4 • 56M

Paul Kennedy Series: US and Japanese WW2 Battles in the Pacific

Today’s topic is the War in the Pacific from Pearl Harbor to The Battle of Midway. Our speaker is Paul Kennedy.

 
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Larry Bernstein:

Welcome to What Happens Next. My name is Larry Bernstein.

What Happens Next is a podcast where the speaker gets to present his argument in just Six Minutes and that is followed by a question-and-answer period for deeper engagement.

Today’s discussion will be on the War in the Pacific from Pearl Harbor to The Battle of Midway.

Our speaker is Paul Kennedy who is the J. Richardson Dilworth Professor of History and Global Affairs at Yale. Paul is one of our greatest living historians and he will discuss the battle between the US and Japanese in the Pacific during WW2.

Today’s session will be the first in a four-part series with Paul Kennedy. Today’s podcast will be followed-up with The Battle of the Atlantic, The Normandy Invasion and the surrender of Germany, and finally the Conquest of Japan. I expect this series to be spectacular. Buckle up.

Paul Kennedy:

Topic: US and Japanese WW2 Battles in the Pacific
Bio: J. Richardson Dilworth Professor of History at Yale
Reading: Victory at Sea is here

Opening Remarks

[On his new book, Victory at Sea]

It's a Paul Kennedy, historian at Yale, one volume account of the naval battles from 1939 to 1945.

At the beginning of the story, the United States is one of merely six great navies in the world. After the war, the US Navy has come out supreme right across the globe. The sheer output of American production, like a new aircraft carrier once a month entering the Pacific fleet by 1943, which quite staggers the mind. So please think of this book as about how at that time, the world order of power shifts from being a multipolar to a single polar world, at least in naval terms, from 1945 onwards.